Maveal, Gary

Professor of Law

Contact

  • Room: 327
  • Telephone: 313-596-0218
  • E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • J.D. University of Detroit '81
  • B.A. Wayne State University '77
  • Curriculum Vitae

Professor Maveal began his career as a law clerk to two Michigan and United States trial judges and later served as Assistant United States Attorney in Detroit. He taught appellate advocacy and government drug forfeiture strategy at U.S. Department of Justice seminars.

Professor Maveal joined the faculty in 1988. He serves as the administrator of the Law School's American Inns of Court, a program designed to give students insights into litigating techniques and professional responsibility.

Prof. Maveal’s current scholarship is an historical and comparative analysis of Michigan’s Supreme Court rule allowing summary rulings by “peremptory” orders on applications for leave to appeal.  Other state supreme courts may grant or deny requests for discretionary review, but do not reach their merits without full briefing absent an emergency.   MCR 7.302(H)(1) authorizes the Supreme Court to enter a final decision simply upon an application.

The paper traces this unusual rule to the creation of the Michigan Court of Appeals in 1964.  In drawing new rules for appeals, the Supreme Court arrogated a power from former practice of summarily issuing writs of "peremptory"  mandamus where the applicant showed that a clear entitlement to it.  This “peremptory order” rule melded rules drawn for mandamus and emergency cases into a blanket authorization to rule summarily on the merits of any application to review a ruling of the new Court of Appeals.  The paper proposes that the peremptory order rule be revised to allow accelerated rulings on the merits only in emergencies or where the Justices are unanimous. 

The article, Michigan Peremptory Orders: A Supreme Oddity, is published in 58 Wayne Law Review 417 and can be found HERE 

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