HANDS-ON LEARNING FROM DAY ONE

HANDS-ON LEARNING FROM DAY ONE

  • * A legal writing program that starts in the first year and continues through the upper level courses.
  • * A clinical program that entitles every student to the opportunity to represent a live client.
  • * A unique law firm program that allows students to engage in simulated cases and transactions in specific practice areas.

DEDICATED TO SOCIAL JUSTICE

DEDICATED TO SOCIAL JUSTICE

  • * Committed to developing lawyers who serve the public good
  • * Committed to serving the Detroit community
  • * Founded on Jesuit and Mercy principles of service and the success of each individual

Study Internationally

Study Internationally

  • * Dual degree program with the University of Windsor
  • * Extensive international law and comparative law courses
  • * Established relationship with Universite d"Auvergne in Clermont-Ferrand, France

EXPAND YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

EXPAND YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

  • * Downtown Detroit Location provides proximity to courts and employers
  • * Strong Alumni Network dedicated to supporting UDM graduates
  • * ability to pursue a concentration in Immigration Law

Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

Effective July 1, 2011

 

NOTE: For purposes of financial aid Satisfactory Academic Progress, an Academic Year is defined as 2 semesters. Summer terms are considered one-half of an academic year for financial aid SAP purposes.

Satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is a term used to describe a student’s successful completion of coursework toward a degree or certificate. SAP is required to receive all federal and state financial aid.

Federal regulations require the Financial Aid Office to apply reasonable standards for measuring whether a student is making progress toward a degree. This is to ensure that students receiving funds are successfully progressing through their program of study.

If you do not meet the minimum requirements, you could lose your eligibility for financial aid.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards

Student academic progress is measured at the end of each semester against the following qualitative and quantitative standards:  cumulative grade point average (GPA), completion rate (pace), maximum time frame and meeting the academic standards of your school or college (e.g., the College of Engineering and Science, the School of Architecture, etc.).

Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)

2.0 for undergraduate, Law and Dental (DDS) programs, 3.0 for graduate programs.  At any time that it becomes mathematically impossible for the student to meet the GPA requirement by the time the student would complete enough credit hours to graduate, the student becomes ineligible for federal aid.

Completion Rate (Pace)

At least 75% of all credit hours attempted must have passing grades that can be applied to the degree.  The 75% completion rate maintains a pace of progression toward the degree or certificate that ensures completion of the academic credential within the maximum time frame allowed.  The pace of progress is calculated by dividing cumulative hours that you have successfully completed by the cumulative hours you have attempted.  This includes hours attempted for which you do not receive credit, such as repeated courses which do not count toward your degree and classes taken prior to re-starting your degree program.

Note: Credit hours transferred from other schools that are accepted toward completion of a student’s UDM program count as hours attempted and hours completed.  However, transfer credit hours are not included in the calculation of a student’s grade point average. Please refer to the Grades and Credits section of this policy for a list of attempted credit hours.

Maximum Time Frame

Students must complete a degree or certificate program in no more than 150% of the published length of the program in credit hours.  Examples:

Undergraduate degrees that require 126 credit hours:

Attempted credit hours may not exceed 189 (126 credits x 150% = 189 credits).

Master’s degrees that require 36 credit hours:

Attempted credit hours may not exceed 54 (36 credits x 150% = 54 credits).

Professional and other degrees that require completion within a specific number of years from the start date:

Student must complete degree in no more than the maximum number of calendar years from the date s/he began the program AND student must complete at least 75% of credit hours attempted during any given semester AND attempted credit hours may not exceed 150% of the required credit hours for the student’s program of study.

Note:  If at any point it becomes mathematically impossible for the student to meet degree completion and/or grade point requirements prior to the maximum time frame, the student immediately becomes ineligible for future federal (and/or) state financial aid.

Procedures

Each aid recipient's record will be evaluated at the end of each semester to determine if the student is meeting the standards described above.  Students with classes that require more than one semester to receive a grade will be evaluated both on a semester basis for any classes graded at the end of the term, and at the completion of the class for multi-semester classes. If the student has reached the maximum number of scheduled hours or maximum years without earning a degree or it is mathematically impossible for the student to do so in the remaining number of hours or time frame, the student must be excluded from further participation in federal financial aid programs.

Financial Aid Warning 

Students whose classes meet for two or more terms before a grade is given do not qualify for a warning semester.  Students in this category have their aid suspended at the end of the second semester of two-term classes during which they have not made SAP and must appeal for SAP probation to receive consideration for any further financial aid (see below). 

Financial Aid Probation

Students will receive a "financial aid warning" letter the first time they have experienced academic difficulty which results in not meeting the SAP standards.  The letter will remind them of the minimum academic requirements for their aid programs and strongly urge them to take advantage of the academic services that are available to students at UDM.  Students will be required to meet with their academic advisor to discuss strategies for a successful semester and return the letter, endorsed by the academic advisor and the student.  Students will be eligible to receive federal aid duringthiswarningsemester.  These students are notified that their records will be checked again at the end of the semester and that further action will be taken if the student does not meet SAP standards at that time.  Students will be sent a financial aid suspension letter if, at the end of the warning semester, they are not meeting SAP standards.  Students may receive aid for only one semester under this "warning" status.

Financial aid probation status will be assigned to students who have failed to meet SAP standards and have successfully appealed to have their aid eligibility reinstated.

Students who are not meeting SAP standards after a semester with a warning status or who attend multi-term classes may appeal to have their aid eligibility reinstated.  If the appeal is approved the student will be offered a financial aid probation contract.  The contract will outline the academic requirements the student must meet in order to receive aid for the following semester.  This contract must be approved by an academic advisor in the student’s college or school and can be modified by the advisor to include any steps required by the college or school for the student to maintain good academic standing within that college or school.  If the student on financial aid probation meets the terms of the probation, he/she will be permitted to continue to participate in the federal student aid programs for a subsequent semester. Students who have been placed on probation shall be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress for the purposes of receiving financial aid as long as they continue to meet the academic requirements outlined in their probationary contract which may extend to one or more semesters.

The Scholarship and Financial Aid Office will review the records of students who are on financial aid probation at the end of each semester to determine continued eligibility.

If the student does not meet the terms of the probation, the student will forfeit eligibility for all federal and state financial aid programs.

Federal regulations require that these standards apply to all students, even to first-time aid applicants who have previously enrolled at the University of Detroit Mercy, or to those who have not been formally placed on probation.

Loss of eligibility due to lack of satisfactory progress

A student who has lost eligibility to participate in federal or state student aid programs for reasons of academic progress can regain that eligibility by enrolling at his/her own expense and demonstrating that he/she is capable of completing a semester without any failures, incompletes or withdrawals and showing the ability to complete his/her degree requirements in a more regular fashion and by submitting an appeal for reinstatement.  The mere passage of time will not ordinarily restore eligibility to a student who has lost eligibility for failure to make satisfactory progress.

Students who have been academically dismissed from the university but who are subsequently given permission to re-enroll are not automatically eligible to continue to participate in federal, state, or institutional aid programs.  Admissions decisions are totally separate from funding decisions.

SAP Appeal

The SAP appeal must include:

  1. An explanation of your overall situation, including your entire academic history at UDM, detailing the circumstances that contributed to your inability to meet the Financial Aid satisfactory Academic Progress Standards.
  2. An explanation of circumstances that contributed to your most recent unsuccessful semester.
  3. Demonstrate what you have done to correct the problems that have hindered your success.
  4. Attach supporting documents, such as obituaries, medical notices, tutoring contracts, etc.

Students should not assume that a SAP appeal will be approved and accept responsibility for paying their tuition and fees if the appeal is denied.

Grades and Credits

Attempted credit hours include the following whether or not paid for with financial aid:

  1. Earned Hours (A-D)
  2. Pass (P)
  3. Satisfactory (S)
  4. No Record (NR)
  5. Unsatisfactory (U)
  6. Withdrawal (W)
  7. Failure (F)
  8. Incomplete (I)
  9. Incomplete/Failing (I/F)
  10. Numerical grades (0.0 - 4.0)
  11. Transfer Credit
  12. What about an X?  Should we mention here?

Repeated Courses

If f a student repeats a course, credit hours for each registration in the course will be added to his/her attempted credit hours total. Only the most recent grade received in the course will be included in the calculation of the undergraduate student’s cumulative GPA.  All grades are included in the GPA calculation for graduate and professional students. 

If a student is dismissed and then re-admitted as a new start, courses taken prior to the dismissal are counted for purposes of the 75% completion rate and the maximum time allowed.

Note: Federal financial aid will pay for only one repeat of a previously passed course.

Withdrawal from Courses: If a student withdraws from a course after the drop/add period the course credit hours will be added to his/her attempted credit hours total.

Remedial Courses: Credit hours for each remedial course a student takes are included in the calculation of his/her attempted credit hours total but not in the calculation of his/her GPA.

Incomplete Courses: Credit hours for incomplete courses are included in the calculation of a student’s attempted credit hours total but not in the calculation of his/her GPA.

Audit Courses: Credit hours are not earned for audited courses; therefore, they are not included in the calculation of a student’s attempted credit hours total or GPA.

Pass/Fail Courses: Credit hours for pass/fail courses are included in the calculation of a student’s attempted credit hours total but not in the calculation of his/her GPA.

Undergraduate Courses at the Graduate Level: Undergraduate courses taken by graduate students do not earn graduate credit, and therefore, they are not included in the calculation of the students’ graduate GPA, or included in the calculation of the student’s attempted credit hours total for the graduate program.

Change Majors Courses: For students who change majors, the credit hours taken under all majors will be included in the calculation of the attempted credit hours total, the GPA calculation, and the maximum time frame for degree completion.

Student Support Services:

The Financial Aid Office encourages any student experiencing academic difficulties to utilize the resources available at University of Detroit Mercy.  These are valuable resources to assist you if you are struggling to maintain satisfactory academic progress.  You do not have to be on probation or in a warning status to use these resources!

University Academic Services:

McNichols Library, Room 319
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.udmercy.edu/uas
313-993-1143

The Writing Center:

McNichols Campus
Briggs 135
liberalarts.udmercy.edu/english/twc
313-993-1022

University Ministry:

McNichols Campus
Student Center – Across from Bookstore
www.udmercy.edu/ministry
313-993-1560

Counseling Wellness Center:

McNichols Campus
West Quad – Wellness Center Room 105
www.udmercy.edu/slo/intra_wellness/counseling
313-578-0496 or 313-993-1170

Law School Academic Support Services:

Renaissance Campus/Dowling Hall Room 325A
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   (Ms. Nancy Omichinski)
313-596-0226

The Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form can be downloaded from the Scholarship and Financial Aid Forms website

EVENTS


Resume Bootcamp with LexisNexis - Room 235

Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 12:30 pm

Gain the skills required to prepare an effective resume and cover letter for legal employers, which are different from application materials you may have prepared for other job opportunities. Duplicate sessions will be offered for Evening students and Dual JD students.  You are welcome to attend the session that best fits your course schedule.  Please register for the afternoon session in advance to facilitate ordering adequate lunch refreshments.


Resume Bootcamp with LexisNexis: Evening Edition - Room 235

Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 5:00 pm

Please see the description above and register for the evening session in advance to facilitate ordering adequate dinner refreshments.


Resume Bootcamp: Dual JD Edition - Room 235

Tuesday, November 4, 2014 - 1:00 pm

Please see the October 28 event description above and register for the Dual JD session in advance to facilitate ordering adequate lunch refreshments.


Careers in Immigration Law: Alumni Perspectives - Room 252

Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 5:00 pm

UDM alumni Egi Deromemaj, Mani Khavajian, and Joel Wisniewski will share insight on the diverse career paths available for law students interested in practicing immigration law, including family-based immigration, employment-based immigration, and removal defense work, with an emphasis on those in solo practice and small law firm settings.  Your advance registration is appreciated as dinner will be provided.


Prospective Student Open House - UDM Law Campus

Saturday, November 8, 2014 - 10:00 am

Find out why men and women have been choosing UDM Law for over 100 years for their legal education.  Learn how UDM Law not only teaches you the law, but teaches you how to be a lawyer.  Through your education here, you will become a lawyer who makes a difference in your workplace and your community.  

Attendees will have the opportunity to tour the campus and speak with admissions representatives, faculty and current students.  


Mentor Jet: Taking Networking to New Heights - Atrium

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 5:00 pm

UDM Law in partnership with the National Association of Women Judges, the Detroit Metropolitan Bar Association, and the Women Lawyers Association of Michigan-Wayne Region present Mentor Jet: Taking Networking to New Heights. Meet judges and lawyers, and possibly gain a mentor in a fun, "speed-networking" format.  A reception will follow the program.  Advance registration on Career Connect is required as space is limited.


Reunion for All Law Alumni - UDM Law Campus

Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 6:30 pm

The School of Law's annual Reunion will be held on Saturday, November 15, from 6:30 - 11:00 p.m. at the School's Riverfront Campus.  As part of the festivities, we will celebrate the selection of Michigan Supreme Court Justice Brian K. Zahra ('87) as UDM's 2014 Alumni Award recipient.  The Reunion is for all School of Law alumni.  For details and to register online, please visit the Reunion Website at www.law.udmercy.edu/reunion 

NEWS

  • Law School Recruiting for Faculty Members

    The Law School's Faculty Recruitment Committee is looking to fill three positions for full-time tenure-track (or tenured) faculty to begin in 2015-16 in the following areas:

    1. Commercial or business law professor for upper-class courses in the J.D. program and possibly the Dual JD Program with the University of Windsor Faculty of Law. The Dual J.D. curriculum is particularly rich in cross-border commercial law offerings, and preference will be given to candidates with a background or interest in international commercial law.

    2. Clinical professor for our new intellectual property clinic which has been certified by U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. (The USPTO has opened its first satellite office in Detroit.)

    3. Professor to teach Comparative Legal Writing & Research in the Dual JD Program. The year-long course is an immersion in the U.S. and Canadian systems and features moot court exercises in both jurisdictions.

    The School of Law is committed to faculty diversity.

  • NATIONAL TRIAL ADVOCACY COMPETITION SUCCESS

    This past weekend, four of our students competed in the MSU College of Law's National Trial Advocacy Competition:  Charity Dean, Christina DiMichele, David Drwencke, and Veronica Ibrahim.  The team competed at the federal courthouse in downtown Detroit, a short walk from the UDM Law campus.

    Christina DiMichele and David Drwencke represented the prosecution while Charity Dean and Veronica Ibrahim represented the defense in a murder trial that was similar to the recent Renisha McBride case, where a young woman was shot and killed on a front porch in Dearborn Heights by homeowner Theodore Wafer.

    Two of our students won top honors: Veronica Ibrahim won Best Opening Statement and Charity Dean won Best Closing Statement.  Each of their performances was the best out of a total of 96 openings and 96 closings in the tournament.  

    >>

  • UDM LAW ALUMNUS DANIEL HURLBERT RECEIVES 20 UNDER 40 LEADERSHIP RECOGNITION AWARD

    Daniel Hurlbert (’10), Manager of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Veterans Program, is a recipient of the 2014 20 Under 40 Leadership Recognition Award which recognizes the top 20 young, dynamic leaders in northwest Ohio and southwest Michigan under the age of 40.  He began his work in the veterans' services area in UDM Law's Project SALUTE and Veterans Appellate Clinic.

    Read News Article

  • UDM LAW PROFESSORS LARRY DUBIN AND RICHARD KRISCIUNAS PROVIDE EXPERT COMMENTARY ON THE BASHARA MURDER TRIAL

    Bob Bashara to go on trial today in wife's killing, Oct. 7, 2014, Detroit Free Press (quoting Professor Richard Krisciunas)

    Bashara murder trial likely to draw media frenzy, Oct. 5, 2014, Detroit News (quoting Professor Larry Dubin)

  • SUPREME COURT APPOINTS UDM LAW ALUMNUS ALAN GERSHEL GRIEVANCE ADMINISTRATOR

    The Michigan Supreme Court has appointed alumnus Alan M. Gershel ('78) to be grievance administrator for the Attorney Grievance Commission.  Mr. Gershel served in the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Michigan for nearly 30 years, including 19 years as Chief of the Criminal Division.  He was an adjunct faculty member at UDM Law for approximately 20 years and has been honored as our Moot Court Alumni Member of the Year for his commitment to the program.

    Read Press Release

  • PROFESSOR TROY HARRIS NAMED TO PRESTIGIOUS GLOBAL ARBITRATOR LIST

    Professor Troy Harris has been listed in the 2015 global edition of Who's Who Legal:  Arbitration.  He was selected through a peer-nomination process that required independent nominations and a thorough international media review and peer interviews.  He was one of only 120 Americans - and one of only ten academics - to make the list.  He was also recently elected a fellow of the American Bar Foundation, an honor that is limited to less than one percent of lawyers licensed to practice in each jurisdiction.

    Read Press Release