HANDS-ON LEARNING FROM DAY ONE

HANDS-ON LEARNING FROM DAY ONE

  • * A legal writing program that starts in the first year and continues through the upper level courses.
  • * A clinical program that entitles every student to the opportunity to represent a live client.
  • * A unique law firm program that allows students to engage in simulated cases and transactions in specific practice areas.

DEDICATED TO SOCIAL JUSTICE

DEDICATED TO SOCIAL JUSTICE

  • * Committed to developing lawyers who serve the public good
  • * Committed to serving the Detroit community
  • * Founded on Jesuit and Mercy principles of service and the success of each individual

Study Internationally

Study Internationally

  • * Dual degree program with the University of Windsor
  • * Extensive international law and comparative law courses
  • * Established relationship with Universite d"Auvergne in Clermont-Ferrand, France

EXPAND YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

EXPAND YOUR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

  • * Downtown Detroit Location provides proximity to courts and employers
  • * Strong Alumni Network dedicated to supporting UDM graduates
  • * ability to pursue a concentration in Immigration Law

Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2011 JoomlaWorks Ltd.

Local Immigrant Sheds Tears Of Joy Over Change In Deportations

Tears flowed when Caroline Vang Polly of Sterling Heights heard the news today that President Obama would halt deportations of people like her: young, law-abiding, educated, undocumented immigrants who came to the United States before they were 16.

“I just can’t believe it. It’s what so many people have been working so hard for,” said the 28-year-old woman, her voice shaking.

Polly is one of the estimated 800,000 young people who would be affected by the new policy, which was reported by the Associated Press this morning in advance of an afternoon news conference.

The wire service quoted unnamed officials as saying Obama’s directive would allow undocumented immigrants to avoid deportation and be eligible for work permits if they came to the United States before they were 16, are younger than 30, have been in the United States for at least five continuous years, have no criminal history and graduated from high school, received a GED or served in the military.

“This is a long time coming,” says David Koelsch, associated professor and director of the immigration law clinic at University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. “It’s just nice to see the Obama Administration wake up and recognize the reality that we’ve got good, hard-working high school and college students and people in the military who deserve better treatment.”

Koelsch has at least three clients currently who will benefit from Obama’s directive.

“I just emailed them and said, `Hey, good news,’” he said.

Bills have been introduced in the last several sessions of Congress that would have granted the same measures to young people but even with bi-partisan support, they stalled.

Polly, her parents and younger sister have been able to stay because of a private bill introduced by Sen. Carl Levin (D-Detroit) that seeks to grant them citizenship while their immigration appeal proceeds. Polly, who married last year, and her younger sister, Melanie, were born in France. Her parents, who are Hmong, fled there from southeast Asia after the American military left following the Vietnam War.

Nearly 25 years ago, the family came to Michigan on tourist visas issued to them in Europe, mistakenly believing they allowed the Vangs to stay in the States.

Polly’s parents opened Bangkok 96, a popular Thai restaurant in Dearborn, had two more children and learned years later they were actually here illegally. Their case has been in court for years.

Polly, who graduated from Walsh College with a degree in marketing, started a frozen food company with her mother last year called Thai Feast. www.thaifeast.com. They employ a dozen people around the country.

“This whole journey has really pushed us to become better citizens and to prove to the government that we’re not bad people. We pay our taxes, we’re going to school. We’re paying for our tuitions,” Polly said. “We’re working really hard and thinking about what we can do next.”

http://www.deadlinedetroit.com/articles/809/local_immigrant_sheds_tears_of_joy_over_change_in_deportations

EVENTS


January 17, 2015 - Prospective Student Open House - UDM Law Campus

Saturday, January 17, 2015 - 12:00 am

Time of event to be determined. 

Find out why men and women have been choosing UDM Law for over 100 years for their legal education.  Learn how UDM Law not only teaches you the law, but teaches you how to be a lawyer.  Through your education here, you will become a lawyer who makes a difference in your workplace and your community.  

Attendees will have the opportunity to tour the campus and speak with admissions representatives, faculty and current students.  


January 21, 2015 - Walk-in Wednesday - UDM Law Campus

Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - 2:00 pm

Join us for Walk-in Wednesdays. The Admissions Office extends its office hours for students who are interested in learning more about the UDM Law advantage, the application process, and law school in general. No appointment is necessary.


McElroy Lecture on Law and Religion - UDM Law Campus

Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 5:00 pm

Our annual McElroy Lecture provides a forum for prominent thinkers and leaders to address fundamental issues of law, religion, and society.  It seeks to educate students, legal professionals, and the public on a variety of questions related to moral philosophy, freedom of conscience, the interaction of legal and religious institutions, and the role of religion in public life.  Its goal is to encourage discussion of these issues in our community and deepen our understanding of them.  This year's lecturer is Professor Nelson Tebbe of Brooklyn Law School.  The lecture will be held on Wednesday, March 4, from 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. in room 226 of the School of Law, followed by a complimentary reception in the atrium.

 

NEWS

  • PRO BONO PROJECT AT THE U.S. IMMIGRATION COURT– UDM is the only law school in the country to take the lead on such a project

    The U.S. Department of Justice recently approved a project sponsored by UDM's Immigration Law Clinic to provide rights presentations and relief screenings to Central American women and their minor children who entered the U.S. during the recent "surge" in such persons fleeing their home countries. UDM's partners in the project are the Michigan Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center (MIRC), and the American Bar Association (ABA). UDM is the only law school in the country to take the lead on such a project.

    In addition to helping women and children navigate the complexities of the Immigration Court process, the project will help participants in UDM's Solo and Small Firm Incubator Program and UDM's clinic students hone their interviewing and advising skills. Specifically, they will advise, counsel, refer, and, in certain cases, represent women and their children. UDM will also conduct a series of regular trainings for AILA members regarding forms of relief, best practices for representation, and issues unique to women and children respondents.

     

    >>

  • UDM LAW SHINES AT NATIONAL MOOT COURT COMPETITIONS

    The School of Law congratulates the Moot Court Board of Advocates, whose three teams placed high in national competitions over the weekend. The teams' briefs finished at or near the top of competitions in Washington, D.C. and Columbus, Ohio.

    The National Veteran's Law Moot Court team of Jennifer Richards and Christopher Ferlito, coached by Professor Peggy Costello, won the award for Best Respondent Brief at the competition in Washington, D.C. They competed against twenty teams.

    Samantha Boyd and Alexander Brown, coached by alumnus Sean Cowley '09, participated in the New York City Bar Association National Moot Court Competition. The team argued very well in Columbus and achieved a top 10 brief score.

    The team of Emily Banks, Eva Janta, and Julia Abd-Elseed also competed in the New York City Bar Association National Moot Court Competition, receiving one of the highest brief scores in the tournament. Coached by alumni Javon Hindo '13 and Alanna P. O'Rourke '10, they advanced to the quarterfinals. The team was defeated by a margin of merely 1.5 points and narrowly missed the semifinal round.

    >>

  • UDM LAW PROFESSOR LARRY DUBIN PROVIDES EXPERT COMMENTARY ON MICHIGAN'S GAY MARRIAGE BAN

    Professor Larry Dubin commented in the Detroit News recently that the ruling of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in the DeBoer case, upholding MIchigan's gay marriage ban in a 2 -1 split decision by the panel, is an attractive case for the U.S. Supreme Court to review on appeal.  "It is the only circuit that held that voters in a state can deny the right to marriage to same-sex couples.  There also is a good record that was made at trial before Judge Friedman," Dubin said.  "It seems logical that the Court will take this case now that there is a division among the federal circuit courts."

    Michigan couple take gay marriage plea to high court, Nov. 17, 2014, Detroit News (quoting Professor Larry Dubin)

  • ASST. DEAN MARKEISHA MINER PROVIDES ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEW ADVICE IN MICHIGAN LAWYERS WEEKLY

    In a recent edition of Michigan Lawyers Weekly, UDM Law Assistant Dean of Career Services and Outreach Markeisha Miner provided advice to students on how to have a successful on-campus interview.  Some of her key points were to dress professionally, keep your cellphone powered off and stored away, and take advantage of the School of Law's Mentor Jet practice interview session.

    Read Michigan Lawyers Weekly Article "Getting to Know You - How Law Firms Handle the On-Campus Interview"

     

  • 3L VANESSA GUERRA WINS MICHIGAN’S 95TH DISTRICT HOUSE RACE

    vg

    3L Vanessa Guerra, D-Bridgeport Township, became Representative Guerra on November 4 after winning the race for Michigan's House of Representatives to represent her home region of the 95th District. The 25-year-old law student and Bridgeport Township trustee was still canvassing the District on election day and commented, "You can never take anything for granted." Her hard work certainly paid off: she won 76 percent of the vote.

    Read Article

  • UDM LAW ALUMNUS DANIEL HURLBERT RECEIVES 20 UNDER 40 LEADERSHIP RECOGNITION AWARD

    Daniel Hurlbert (’10), Manager of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Veterans Program, is a recipient of the 2014 20 Under 40 Leadership Recognition Award which recognizes the top 20 young, dynamic leaders in northwest Ohio and southwest Michigan under the age of 40.  He began his work in the veterans' services area in UDM Law's Project SALUTE and Veterans Appellate Clinic.

    Read News Article